December 27, 2017

December 25, 2017

Holidays in New York


  1. May this festive season sparkle and shine, may all of your wishes and dreams come true, and may you feel this happiness all year round. Merry Christmas!
Model :   Gabriela Panduru 
Photo :Mike Dikson 











December 23, 2017

Rip King Michael Of Romania



Romania’s former King Michael I, a onetime boy monarch who later engineered the ouster of pro-Nazi strongman Gen. Ion Antonescu during World War II, only to be forced at gunpoint to abdicate by a communist-led postwar government, died Dec. 5 at his home in Aubonne, Switzerland. He was 96.


The cause of death was not immediately announced in a statement from the royal house, but the former monarch had been treated for leukemia and another type of cancer for at least the past year, the family had earlier announced.
King Michael, a member of the House of Hohenzollern and a distant cousin of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, was one of the last surviving links to Europe’s royal heads of state before and during World War II. He lived a life defined by political intrigue and buffeted by nearly every major upheaval on the continent in the past century.
Banished by the communists in early 1948, he spent decades in exile before returning to his homeland amid the collapse of the Soviet bloc. He eventually carved out a role as an unofficial diplomat, helping Romania join NATO in 2004 and the European Union in 2007.
At age 5, in 1927, he became Europe’s youngest king after the ouster of his father, Carol II, who had been given an ultimatum to pick his mistress or the throne. Known for his errant ways, Carol chose the former and went into exile. A council of advisers was set up as a proxy leadership for the young king, but it fell into bickering and rivalries, and Carol returned in 1930 to replace King Michael as monarch.
Britain’s Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain talks to Crown Prince Michael of Romania during a luncheon at the Guildhall in London on Nov. 16, 1938. (AP)
As King Michael finished his education, Carol abolished the constitution and paved the way for his overthrow in 1940 by a military government led by the fascist Antonescu and his “Iron Guard” regime. Suddenly reinstalled at 18 as a figurehead, King Michael said Antonescu treated him “like a child” and excluded him from strategic decisions even though he was nominally head of state and the military.
Although King Michael was said to have harbored loyalties to the West, his country formalized ties with Berlin. The Allies responded with attacks that included a daring, low-level 1943 mission by U.S. bombers against key oil facilities in Ploesti that were feeding the German war machine.
Decades after the war, King Michael told Radio Free Europe that his mother, Princess Helen of Greece and Denmark — whose influence spanned from Antonescu to Romania’s chief rabbi — saved more than 100,000 Jews as Nazi backers ravaged the country.
In 1944, as Soviets advanced on Romania, King Michael built a clandestine network of pro-Allied plotters — including Soviet-linked factions — to lead a revolt that ousted Antonescu, who was later put to death for crimes including the deaths of Romanian Jews and others during the war. King Michael said he rallied his countrymen and staved off attempts by the Germans to replace Antonescu with a puppet leader.
He told Radio Free Europe that the German ambassador “came to the palace, but he did not try to arrest me or something, he just told me that I was playing with fire.”
Under King Michael’s command, Romania signed an armistice with the Allies, speeding the Red Army’s push through the Balkans. The Soviet Union bestowed on him one of its highest military honors, the diamond-studded Order of Victory. But after the war, with thousands of Russian troops stationed in Romania, communists gained a firm grip on power despite opposition from King Michael and his supporters.
Decades after the war, King Michael told Radio Free Europe that his mother, Princess Helen of Greece and Denmark — whose influence spanned from Antonescu to Romania’s chief rabbi — saved more than 100,000 Jews as Nazi backers ravaged the country.
In 1944, as Soviets advanced on Romania, King Michael built a clandestine network of pro-Allied plotters — including Soviet-linked factions — to lead a revolt that ousted Antonescu, who was later put to death for crimes including the deaths of Romanian Jews and others during the war. King Michael said he rallied his countrymen and staved off attempts by the Germans to replace Antonescu with a puppet leader.
He told Radio Free Europe that the German ambassador “came to the palace, but he did not try to arrest me or something, he just told me that I was playing with fire.”
Under King Michael’s command, Romania signed an armistice with the Allies, speeding the Red Army’s push through the Balkans. The Soviet Union bestowed on him one of its highest military honors, the diamond-studded Order of Victory. But after the war, with thousands of Russian troops stationed in Romania, communists gained a firm grip on power despite opposition from King Michael and his supporters.
On Dec. 30, 1947, King Michael was preparing for a New Year’s party at Peles Castle in Sinaia, north of Bucharest, when he was summoned to the capital by government leaders. The streets were filled with pro-communist forces, and King Michael was presented with a typed letter of abdication.
A communist leader — accounts vary on precisely who — pointed a gun at the monarch with a demand: Leave the throne or up to 1,000 detained students could be shot. Later that day, a proclamation was read abolishing the monarchy. Days later, King Michael was forced to leave the country, and his relatives followed.
“It was blackmail,” King Michael told the New York Times in 2007. “They said, ‘If you don’t sign this immediately we are obliged’ — why obliged I don’t know — ‘to kill more than 1,000 students’ that they had in prison.”
Later in 1948, he married Princess Anne of Bourbon-Parma, the independent-minded daughter of Denmark’s princess and a distant cousin he met at the Elizabeth-Philip wedding.
They joined a collection of exiled monarchs whose bloodlines often intersected. King Michael, tall and lanky even into old age, was rarely seen in public without a well-tailored suit and carefully knotted tie. His English carried an upper-crust polish yet still hinted at his Romanian roots.
The couple bounced between Britain, Italy and Switzerland as their family grew to include five daughters who all were given the title princess even though their royal line was outlawed in Romania.
During more than four decades in exile, King Michael was variously a chicken farmer in England, a pilot and instrument tester for a European subsidiary of U.S.-based Lear aircraft (he had learned to fly during the war), and a stockbroker often working from a villa near Geneva.
“I never had my heart in it,” King Michael told the Times of London in 1989 of his time in finance. “I could never reconcile the double life I was leading, one minute mixing with high society, the next acting on behalf of my oppressed countrymen.”
The fall of the Iron Curtain opened a new chapter for the couple.
On Christmas Day in 1990 — a year after the toppling of Romania’s communist strongman Nicolae Ceausescu — King Michael led an entourage back to the country on a 24-hour visa. Less than two years later, on Easter 1992, Romanian authorities gave full permission for his return. A speech from the window of his hotel room drew staggering crowds, which so alarmed Romania’s leaders that King Michael was denied reentry until 1997 after his citizenship was restored.
King Michael’s popularity went only so far. A movement urging the return of the monarchy took root in the late 1990s but never developed serious political clout.
On his 90th birthday, in 2011, he addressed Romania’s Parliament in a speech that included some old-style noblesse oblige that seemed awkwardly out of step in a nation that was by then part of major Western military and political institutions.
“Eighty-four years since I became king, I can say without hesitation to the Romanian nation: After freedom and democracy, the most important things to be gained are identity and dignity,” King Michael told the lawmakers. “Here a major responsibility rests upon the Romanian elite.”
Michael I was born Oct. 25, 1921, at Foisor Castle in Sinaia as the only child of Crown Prince Carol II and Princess Helen. Carol soon threw the family into turmoil with an open affair with a red-haired courtesan whose family background included a Roman Catholic mother and Jewish father.
It was too much scandal for Romania’s royal court. Carol was pressured to renounce his right to the throne in 1925 and left for Paris with his mistress, Elena “Magda” Lupescu, at his side.
In 1927, Prince Michael ascended to the throne after the death of his grandfather, Ferdinand I. A postage stamp issued at the time shows the new King Michael as a chubby-cheeked boy with slightly tousled hair and wearing a shirt and tie.
After King Michael and Queen Anne’s return in the 1990s, the former monarch increasingly was seen as a symbol of national unity and identity.
In March 2016, King Michael announced retirement from public life as he suffered from such ailments as leukemia. His duties fell to his eldest daughter, known as Crown Princess Margareta.
Queen Anne died in 2016. Survivors include his daughters.
In 2009, King Michael told Radio Free Europe that the hardships of the Cold War should not be forgotten even as Romania found relative prosperity with the West.
“Because tens of millions of people have been destroyed, practically, gone through absolute hell, and then suddenly they say, ‘Well, it’s all finished, let’s forget it,’ ” he said. “You don’t forget it.”


Source:Washington Post 

December 19, 2017

A career dedicated to the readers - Reporter Untaru Claudia


The journalist Untaru Claudia is the lady of the Romanian press with whom you feel comfortable talking, a person who loves what he does and does not stay away from any sacrifice in her journalist's job, Claudia is loved and appreciated by all those she comes into contact with and her presence is full of energy! As a journalist she has earned the respect and credibility of people, she writes from her soul something that feels from her articles, she is a modest person, as it is good for an intelligent man, which makes us appreciate her even more.
I had the pleasure of talking to Claudia and asked her to tell us a little about her job and it was great to see how dear she devoted her career to you readers from everywhere




'' I am 39 years old and 15 years ago I first got into contact with journalism. That's when I started going to the field and returning to the Alfa TV newsroom in Petrosani. I liked it a lot and I decided (as an engineer) to specialize in journalism as well. That's how I got to Arad, college, and I did not leave until I got into the press. I have worked in several publications and have had the opportunity to write news from all areas: from politics, administration to sport. Journalism is anything but a job in the world. It always keeps you in the socket and never lets you give in as hard as it may be. There are days when I do not get to eat, sometimes the documentation and the writing of the material takes me all the time. The emergence of online sites makes me even faster. You must always be the one who gives the first or the first material, always be in the phase. Family life stays second, I do not have much time, like household chores, not even me, I am pleased if among the news I start playing with the child and educating him. Good luck that the husband is a journalist and understands. Being a correspondent for a national newspaper, I have the opportunity to write about people doing something for society, who have a beautiful passion. Their stories shape my work. The fact that they have the courage to reveal to tens of thousands of readers what they do gives me the power to wake up in the morning, ready to put a new story on the paper. to dear readers everywhere!


Journalism is not easy, and if you do not have it in your blood you can not do it as much as you can. It's a job you do not do for money, you do it because it's like every day of your professional life to be different. I go through cold or cold, sometimes stand for hours, but do not cry. That's what I chose to do. It's a sacrifice, but it's a nice one. While I think I have finished the day of work, something is coming up and I can not stand still if I do not write a few lines. And while I was laying down these lines about me, I stumbled to post a story. The writing came into my blood and I do not know if I'll ever get rid of him, or I do not think I want to. If you ask me how many sacrifices we always make readers to be informed in time, I say to you that many: we do not sleep, we do not eat and we have no peace until we deliver the news or reports. This is the life of a journalist: he lives for readers and less for him. Thank you, Claudia Untaru and we will continue to follow you with your articles that have arrived abroad as well as on the American continent as well as this interview!









O cariera dedicata cititorilor -Ziarista Untaru Claudia

              Ziarista Untaru Claudia este doamna a presei cu care te simti confortabil sa vorbesti, acel om care iubeste ceea ce face si nu se fereste de nici un sacrificiu in meseria ei de journalist. Claudia este iubita si apreciata de toti cei cu care vine in contact si este o prezenta plina de energie.
Ca ziarist si-a castigat respectul si credibilitatea oamenilor. Scrie din suflet lucru care se simte din articolele sale. Este un om modest asa cum i sta bine unui om inteligent, lucru care o face sa o apreciem si mai mult. Am avut placerea sa vorbesc cu Claudia si am rugat-o sa ne povesteasca putin despre meseria ei si a fost extraordinar sa vad cu cat drag isi dedica cariera pentru voi dragi cititori de pretutindeni!



''Am 39 de ani și în urmă cu 15 ani am luat pentru prima dată contact cu jurnalismul. Mai exact atunci am început să merg pe teren și să mă întorc în redacția Alfa Tv din Petroșani cu știri. Mi-a plăcut mult și am decis (eu fiind inginer) să mă specializez și în jurnalism. Așa am ajuns la Arad, la facultate și nu m-am lăsat până nu m-am angajat în presă. Am lucrat la mai multe publicații și am avut ocazia să scriu știri din toate domeniile: de la politic, adminsitrație și până la sport. Jurnalismul este altceva decât orice meserie din lume. Te ține mereu în priză și niciodată nu te lasă să cedezi oricât de greu ar fi. Sunt zile când nu apuc să mânânc, uneori documentările și scrisul materialului îmi ocupă tot timpu. Apariția site-urilor online mă accelerează și mai mult. Trebuie să fii mereu cel care dai primul sau printre primii un material, să fii mereu pe fază. Viața de familie rămâne în plan secund, nu mai am timp de multe, cum ar fi treburile gospodărești, chiar nici de mine, sunt mulțumită dacă printre știri apuc să mă joc cu copilul și să îl educ. Noroc că soțul e tot jurnalist și înțelege.  Fiind corespondent la un ziar național am ocazia să scriu despre oamenii care fac ceva pentru societate, care au o pasiune frumoasă. Poveștile lor dau contur muncii mele. Faptul că ei prind curaj să dezvăluie zecilor de mii de cititori ceea ce fac îmi dă putere și mie să mă trezesc dimineața pregătită să aștern pe hârtie (site) o nouă poveste.
Jurnalismul nu este ușor și dacă nu îl ai în sânge nu îl poți face oricât te-ai chinui. Este o meserie pe care nu o faci pentru bani, o faci pentru că își place ca fiecare zi din viața ta profesională să fie diferită. Merg prin frig sau pe caniculă, stau uneori ore întregi în picioare, dar nu mă plâng. Asta am ales să fac. E un sacrificiu, dar este unul plăcut. Pe când cred că am termiant ziua de lucru apare ceva și nu pot sta liniștită dacă nu scriu câteva rânduri. Și în timp ce aștern aceste rânduri despre mine m-am înterupt să postez o știre. Scrisul mi-a intrat în sânge și nu știu dacă vreodată voi scăpa de el, nici nu cred că vreau. Dacă mă întrebați câte sacrificii facem ca mereu cititorii să fie informați la timp vă spun că  multe: nu dormim, nu mâncăm și nu avem liniște până nu predăm știrile sau reportajele. Asta este viața unui jurnalist: trăiește pentru cititori și mai puțin pentru el''.

Multumim Claudia Untaru si o sa iti urmarim cu drag in continuare articolele tale care au ajuns  peste hotare  cat si pe continentul American  ca si acest interviu de altfel!







Faces at TCS New York Marathon 2019